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Unlocking the Synergy: The Benefits of MCT Oil and CBD

Unlocking the Synergy: The Benefits of MCT Oil and CBD - KLORIS

The role of MCT oil as a crucial component in many supplement formulations, including CBD oil.

Over the past several years, medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) have gained popularity in the food and supplement industries, with more people seeking whole foods and healthy fats for their nutrition and health. MCT oils are used widely in many industries, including personal care, aromatherapy, nutrition, cosmetics, and medicines.

MCTs are a fantastic option for a variety of reasons. For one, they are naturally occurring fats found in nutritious foods and dairy products and are great for overall health and well-being. Because of MCT oil’s unique chemical composition and how the body processes it, it is a popular choice for supplement formulation. With features such as long shelf life, no flavour, and a neutral scent, it is a great option as a supplement ingredient and specifically as a carrier oil for CBD products (1).

Key benefits of MCT oil:

  • Easily absorbed and metabolised
  • Can increase oral CBD absorption by over 700%
  • Antibacterial and anti-inflammatory
  • Aids fat burn
  • May enhance the entourage effect

Understanding MCT Oil and the stand-alone benefits of MCT

MCT oil is made up of medium-length fat chains called triglycerides derived from oils such as kernel oil and coconut oil, with coconut containing the most MCTs.

MCT contains different types of acids such as caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) that all have unique benefits, however, C6 and C12 are usually removed to give MCT oil a flavourless taste and smooth texture (1).

MCT oil is made by separating C8 and C10 from other fats in coconut oil, and then converting those fatty acids into triglycerides, which are fats that circulate in your blood. Since they can be absorbed and metabolised by the body more quickly than other fatty acids, caprylic and capric acid are beneficial for MCT oil (1).C8 has been reported to improve heart health through increasing metabolism, which is known to reduce heart disease. MCTs may be able to assist with weight issues. Better fat metabolism can also aid in lowering cardiovascular risk factors (2).

C8 and C10 have strong antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties, which have been reported to ease issues such as yeast infections and even improve skin conditions like acne, psoriasis, and dermatophilosis (2).

The stomach absorbs MCTs quickly and doesn’t require bile and pancreatic secretions to be absorbed during digestion. Cells in the stomach lining allow for faster absorption into the bloodstream and direct travel to the liver to be transformed into ketones.

Ketones are formed when the body turns fat into energy, this process is called ketosis. The process of ketosis increases the body’s ability to burn fat, making MCT oil a popular choice for dieting and weight reduction(3). The ketones are then dispersed throughout your body, reaching vital organs such as the heart, brain, kidneys and muscles.

As MCT increase the body’s energy levels and aids fat burn, it also works as a pre-workout for athletes and bodybuilders (4,5). MCTs also can cross the blood-brain barrier, and they can provide the brain and central nervous system with ketones. Because MCTs provide the brain with ketones, they may also be able to lessen the symptoms of dementia in Alzheimer's patients (6).

The Marriage of MCT Oil and CBD

CBD alone is less effective due to the low bioavailability of oral ingestion, which is why a carrier oil like MCT is needed for absorption. Bioavailability through oral ingestion of CBD alone is ∼6%. Many variables contribute to this limited bioavailability, such as the liver’s high metabolism and the stomach’s, which reduces the quantity of CBD accessible to perform physiological actions.

With the addition of a carrier oil like MCT, bioavailability increases to 46%(7). In addition to improving bioavailability, MCT carrier oils improve the stability and quality of a formulation, allowing for rapid digestibility and protecting against degradation (1).

MCT Oil and the Entourage Effect

In essence, the entourage effect idea states that the many elements present in cannabis are complimentary to one another. More than 100 distinct cannabinoids are found in hemp and cannabis plants. Every cannabinoid has distinct qualities of its own, and more and more studies are being done on the characteristics of CBD as well as CBG, CBC, CBN, and CBGA.

It appears that the overall efficacy of CBD is increased when combined with other substances that also interact with the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Although the endocannabinoid system of the body is known to be impacted by both THC and CBD, the wide variety of chemicals present in cannabis plants can have distinct effects on our bodies. Together with other cannabinoids, they also contain terpenes, flavonoids, and fatty acids (8).

MCT allows the entourage effect to have improved efficiency through its bioavailability. Since the body does not need stomach acid to break down CBD in MCT oil, CBD does not disappear via the digestive tract. As a result, your body can get the full effects and advantages of every intake of CBD oil (9).

Additional Resources:

References

  1. Izgelov, D. (2020). The effect of medium chain and long chain triglycerides incorporated in self-nano emulsifying drug delivery systems on oral absorption of cannabinoids in rats. International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 580, 119-201. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2020.119201
  2. Omura, Y., O'Young, B., Jones, M., Pallos, A., Duvvi, H., & Shimotsuura, Y. (2011). Caprylic acid in the effective treatment of intractable medical problems of frequent urination, incontinence, chronic upper respiratory infection, root canalled tooth infection, ALS, etc., caused by asbestos & mixed infections of Candida albicans, Helicobacter pylori & cytomegalovirus with or without other microorganisms & mercury. Acupuncture & electro-therapeutics research, 36(1-2), 19–64. https://doi.org/10.3727/036012911803860886
  3. You, Y.-Q.N., Ling, P.-R., Qu, J.Z. and Bistrian, B.R. (2008), Effects of Medium-Chain Triglycerides, Long-Chain Triglycerides, or 2-Monododecanoin on Fatty Acid Composition in the Portal Vein, Intestinal Lymph, and Systemic Circulation in Rats. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr, 32: 169-175. https://doi.org/10.1177/0148607108314758
  4. St-Onge, MP., Jones, P. Greater rise in fat oxidation with medium-chain triglyceride consumption relative to long-chain triglyceride is associated with lower initial body weight and greater loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Int J Obes 27, 1565–1571 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0802467
  5. Schönfeld P and Wojtczak L. “Short- and Medium-Chain Fatty Acids in Energy Metabolism: The Cellular Perspective.” J Lipid Res. 2016;57(6):943-954.https://doi.org/10.1194/jlr.R067629
  6. Schönfeld, P., & Wojtczak, L. (2016). Short- and medium-chain fatty acids in energy metabolism: the cellular perspective. Journal of lipid research, 57(6), 943–954. https://doi.org/10.1194/jlr.R067629Schönfeld, P., & Wojtczak, L. (2016). Short- and medium-chain fatty acids in energy metabolism: the cellular perspective. Journal of lipid research, 57(6), 943–954. https://doi.org/10.1194/jlr.R067629
  7. Wang, C., Dong, C., Lu, Y., Freeman, K., Wang, C., & Guo, M. (2023). Digestion behavior, in vitro and in vivo bioavailability of cannabidiol in emulsions stabilized by whey protein-maltodextrin conjugate: Impact of carrier oil. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 223, 113154.https://doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2023.113154
  8. Brent McFerran, Jennifer J. Argo, The Entourage Effect, Journal of Consumer Research, Volume 40, Issue 5, 1 February 2014, Pages 871–884, https://doi.org/10.1086/673262
  9. Russo, E.B. (2011), Taming THC: potential cannabis synergy and phytocannabinoid-terpenoid entourage effects. British Journal of Pharmacology, 163: 1344-1364. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01238.x